Investment

Investment 2018-06-19T13:45:10+00:00

Commercial real estate has reached a new era:

global investors are chasing yield in secondary markets; cash flow has become as important as cap rate compression; and a flight to quality has replaced portfolio and entity-level transactions. Now more than ever, the industry needs local expertise skilled in analysis, asset management, and appreciation.



Mastering a New Mindset
Technology isn't just making commercial real estate more efficient; it's changing tenant expectations. Meeting those new expectations will allow industry players to thrive. To get there, commercial real estate professionals need to adopt a user experience mindset.
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Big-League Deals
CCIM designees completed an outstanding year in 2017, with plenty of big deals in office, multifamily, industrial, and retail. Several of those CCIMs who closed the biggest deals discuss the secrets of managing huge transactions.
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China’s Transformation
China's outbound commercial real estate investment activities are accelerating its structural transformation from a government-led economy to a market-driven economy.
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Negotiating Difficult Deals
For advisers to less experienced investors, the commercial real estate transaction remains all too human. It's their job to navigate through the emotions, the competing interests, and the miscommunication to get to that closing. CCIMs use radical empathy to achieve positive outcomes.
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Ahead of the Curve
With markets changing rapidly, commercial real estate professionals are finding new ways to adapt successfully. Trends such as vibrant downtowns, alternative lending, property and land reuse, and international investment in the U.S. can be ideal springboards.
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CCIM Institute created the language of global real estate investment. Our courses and worldwide community deploy commercial real estate investment methodologies and tools that speed the pathway between opportunity, a go/no-go decision and success for an asset, taught by instructors who are themselves industry leaders. Today, the organization, through its 50 chapters, continues to innovate best practices and elevate the commercial real estate professional through its core designation program to earn the CCIM pin — real estate’s most coveted credential — and its topical education courses offered through the Ward Center for Real Estate Studies.

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No two days are the same.
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